The Educational Attainment of Army Children

Abstract: The main aim of this report is to compare educational attainment of Army children compared to non-Army children. To do this, the report consists of the finding of 3 research studies project A, B and C. Project A consisted of a survey conducted on an equal number of Army and non-Army children in years 10 & 11. Project B consisted of an online survey completed by Army parents and Project C, consisted of an online survey completed by teachers, teaching and supporting Army children in school. A number of recommendations are made which focus on  educational experience, meeting potential, repeating material, specialised support and activities and special educational needs.
 
 

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